Source: plannedparenthood.org

Source: plannedparenthood.org

Testicular cancer is one of the few cancer types that happen only to men. Considered as a defining aspect of manhood, it is no wonder that men have trouble talking about testicular cancer.

This disease is not common. In fact, only about 1% of men are affected. It is also very treatable, with nine out of ten men surviving after initial treatment and a five year survival rate of 95%. This form of cancer mostly affects men aged between 15 to 40 years.

Signs and symptoms of testicular include:

  • Painless growth in either testis
  • Change in size or texture of the testis
  • Heaviness in the region
  • Dragging sensation in the scrotum
  • Fluid collection in the scrotum

These symptoms are not a definitive indication of tumour growth and can be easily checked out via a non-invasive ultrasound scan.

Due to the fact that testicular cancer has been mired in myth, we’ll be taking aim at the top 5 testicular cancer myths and debunking them one at a time.

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Myth #1: Riding bicycles cause testicular cancer

Source: cyclesprog.co.uk

Source: cyclesprog.co.uk

While Lance Armstrong may have very famously come down with testicular cancer multiple times, cycling is not a cause of testicular cancer. Competitive cycling, while abusive to the testicles, does not affect them cellularly.

Myth #2: Testicular cancer spreads upon surgery

Source: ptsdperspectives.org

Source: ptsdperspectives.org

This myth was perpetuated many years ago when the disease used to be diagnosed at later stages. This means that the cancer has usually spread. Patients blame the spread on surgery, when the spread had actually occurred before they had ever undergone any surgical procedure.

Myth #3: Testicular cancer is the end of your sex life

Source: huffpost.com

Source: huffpost.com

In most cases, only the affected testicle is removed in a procedure known as an orchiectomy. As such, there will be no noticeable difference in sexual drive. There is also no diminished reproductive ability. The only time there will be a loss of sexual function is when both testicles are removed.

Myth #4: Vasectomies cause testicular cancer

Source: sfbayview.com

Source: sfbayview.com

There have been concerns that vasectomies cause testicular concern. In a study done by medical professionals on men who have undergone vasectomies, there was no increased incidence in testicular cancer observed. Other studies also arrive at similar conclusions. Therefore, there is no evidence that vasectomies cause testicular cancer.

Myth #5: Talcum powder causes testicular cancer

Source: scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org

Source: scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org

While it is true that talc in its natural form may contain cancer-causing asbestos, modern domestic talcum powder does not contain asbestos. You should only be concerned if you are exposed to talc in mining, milling or long term exposure to natural talc fibres.

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